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Highlights

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - Back Cover

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - July

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - May

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - March

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - February

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - October

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - September

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - June

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - August

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - January

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - December

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - November

1961 US Army Sketch Calendar - Cover

GE Snap-27 on Apollo 12 Mission

Mars Polar Outpost

Mars Orbiting City

Mars Subsurface City

Mars Metropolis

Mars Early Subsurface Outpost

Mars Trip Characteristics from "The Mars Exploration Chart"

Mission Profile from "The Mars Exploration Chart"

Mars Physical Data from "The Mars Exploration Chart"

Mercator's Projection of Mars from "The Mars Exploration Chart"

Mars Globe from "The Mars Exploration Chart"

Major Parameters of Exploration from

Mars Exploration from "The Mars Exploration Chart"

Mariner IV Photographs from "The Mars Exploration Chart"

The Mars Exploration Chart

Aerospace Management Magazine, 1971, Vol 6, No 1

Aerospace Management Magazine, 1969, Vol 4, No 1

Aerospace Management Magazine, Spring 1966, Vol 1, No 1

Aerospace Management Magazine, Summer 1966, Vol 1, No 1

Launch Sequence, Dyna-Soar (Titan III), The New York Times, Major Feature 1962

Titan III, Dyna-Soar (Titan III), The New York Times, Major Feature 1962

Dyna-Soar (Titan III), The New York Times, Major Feature 1962

Landing Pattern, Dyna-Soar (Titan III), The New York Times, Major Feature 1962

Re-Entry, Dyna-Soar (Titan III), The New York Times, Major Feature 1962

Interceptor, Dyna-Soar (Titan III), The New York Times, Major Feature 1962

Reconnaissance, Dyna-Soar (Titan III), The New York Times, Major Feature 1962

International Association of Astronomical Artists

America's Astronauts -

Introducing Father Ralph Hartman

Safe Down, Man on Moon NYT 1962

Homing Flight, Man on Moon, NYT 1962

Moonwork, Man on Moon, NYT 1962

Soft Touchdown, Man on Moon, NYT 1962

Slow Approach, Man on Moon, NYT 2006

Space Life, Man on Moon, NYT 1962

Join-up, Man on Moon, NYT 1962

Man on the Moon, New York Times March 4, 1962

Man Steps Out -Setup, 1964

Man Steps Out - Upkeep, 1964

Man Steps Out - Spacemen at Work, 1964

When Man Steps Into Space

Grandma Moses

Chesley Bonestell

Space Station Article for The New York Times 1962

Space Station Components 1962

Space Station Observatory 1962

Space Station in Action 1962

Space Station Join-Up 1962

Space Station Rendezvous 1962

Space Station Training Base 1962

Space Station Repairs 1962

Space Station Service Stop 1962

Advanced Lunar City

Closed-Cycle Societies

Improvements in Man

Importance of Space Flight

Civilizations in Space

Science and Religion in Space

Mechanism of Resurrection

Becoming a Space Artist

About Dandridge Cole

Predicting the Future

Filter your Future:
Space Station Article for The New York Times 1962
May 06, 2006 // // New York Times Major Features II

On May 16, 1962, I sent a letter to Mike O’Keefe, my contact at The New York Times discussing the concept of an article on space stations. I was given the green light to proceed with layouts and comprehensives for a double page spread in the Sunday Magazine section. The finished article appeared in The New York Times Magazine on July 22, 1962, on pages 6 and 7 under the title “First ‘Colony’ in Space” containing eight illustrations.

Nine years later the Soviet Union launched the world’s first space station, Salyut 1. Eleven years later in 1973 the United States sent its first space station, the large SKYLAB, into space and abandoned it in 1974. In 1998 the first two modules of the International Space Station were launched and joined together in orbit. Other modules soon followed and the first crew arrived in 2000.

From The New York Times Magazine, July 22, 1962, “First ‘Colony’ in Space”:
It is less than five years since Sputnik I marked man’s first success in putting an object
into an orbit of the earth. In the period since, triumph has followed triumph: scores of instrument satellites have been placed in the heavens; capsules have been rocketed to the moon and beyond; men have orbited the earth singly and are now getting ready for greater adventures in groups.

So fast has been the acceleration in achievement that scientists are already matter-of-factly at work on the colonization of space itself. They are designing the first “space colonies” – large and complex assemblies that will move in long-term orbits, circling the earth at a speed of some 16,000 miles and hour. Regular crews will live aboard for tours of thirty days or more.

These early “colonies” will be way-stations for travelers to farther realms; they will be able to overhaul and repair instrument satellites; they will be training bases for future astronauts under conditions far better than can be simulated on the ground; they will be splendidly equipped observatories.

It may sound like more science fiction, but it may well be reality in another ten years or so.

How would the stations be put in orbit? Present thinking suggests that unmanned subassemblies will be rocketed to a rendezvous point some 200 – 300 miles out. There they will be locked together by their crews, who will have followed in “ferry” capsules of the Gemini type.

On these pages are visualizations by Roy Scarfo, an artist engaged in the General Electric space program, based on the latest available data, of how the procedure may go and how the space stations will function.


All images Copyrighted 2007 Roy Scarfo


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