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1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - Back Cover

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - July

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - May

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - March

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - February

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - October

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - September

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - June

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - August

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - January

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - December

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - November

1961 US Army Sketch Calendar - Cover

GE Snap-27 on Apollo 12 Mission

Mars Polar Outpost

Mars Orbiting City

Mars Subsurface City

Mars Metropolis

Mars Early Subsurface Outpost

Mars Trip Characteristics from "The Mars Exploration Chart"

Mission Profile from "The Mars Exploration Chart"

Mars Physical Data from "The Mars Exploration Chart"

Mercator's Projection of Mars from "The Mars Exploration Chart"

Mars Globe from "The Mars Exploration Chart"

Major Parameters of Exploration from

Mars Exploration from "The Mars Exploration Chart"

Mariner IV Photographs from "The Mars Exploration Chart"

The Mars Exploration Chart

Aerospace Management Magazine, 1971, Vol 6, No 1

Aerospace Management Magazine, 1969, Vol 4, No 1

Aerospace Management Magazine, Spring 1966, Vol 1, No 1

Aerospace Management Magazine, Summer 1966, Vol 1, No 1

Launch Sequence, Dyna-Soar (Titan III), The New York Times, Major Feature 1962

Titan III, Dyna-Soar (Titan III), The New York Times, Major Feature 1962

Dyna-Soar (Titan III), The New York Times, Major Feature 1962

Landing Pattern, Dyna-Soar (Titan III), The New York Times, Major Feature 1962

Re-Entry, Dyna-Soar (Titan III), The New York Times, Major Feature 1962

Interceptor, Dyna-Soar (Titan III), The New York Times, Major Feature 1962

Reconnaissance, Dyna-Soar (Titan III), The New York Times, Major Feature 1962

International Association of Astronomical Artists

America's Astronauts -

Introducing Father Ralph Hartman

Safe Down, Man on Moon NYT 1962

Homing Flight, Man on Moon, NYT 1962

Moonwork, Man on Moon, NYT 1962

Soft Touchdown, Man on Moon, NYT 1962

Slow Approach, Man on Moon, NYT 2006

Space Life, Man on Moon, NYT 1962

Join-up, Man on Moon, NYT 1962

Man on the Moon, New York Times March 4, 1962

Man Steps Out -Setup, 1964

Man Steps Out - Upkeep, 1964

Man Steps Out - Spacemen at Work, 1964

When Man Steps Into Space

Grandma Moses

Chesley Bonestell

Space Station Article for The New York Times 1962

Space Station Components 1962

Space Station Observatory 1962

Space Station in Action 1962

Space Station Join-Up 1962

Space Station Rendezvous 1962

Space Station Training Base 1962

Space Station Repairs 1962

Space Station Service Stop 1962

Advanced Lunar City

Closed-Cycle Societies

Improvements in Man

Importance of Space Flight

Civilizations in Space

Science and Religion in Space

Mechanism of Resurrection

Becoming a Space Artist

About Dandridge Cole

Predicting the Future

Filter your Future:
Becoming a Space Artist
Apr 03, 2005 // // Space Artist

How do you become a space artist? I don’t know of any art schools that teach space art. The most important thing is that you have a good background in art and illustration, and hope that you find a job with a company that is involved in some way with space programs.

My last two jobs before I went to work with GE’s Space Technology Center was that of a package designer for Container Corporation and then retouching color photos of toys for catalogs which near drove me to the ends of my endurance. At the same time I was airbrushing photos of tank parts for a government publication on a freelance basis. Talk about jobs you hate, this was one, but it paid well, and I needed the money.

In 1957 when I heard of an opening for an artist with GE’s Space Technology Center, I prepared my portfolio and was at their doorstep the next day. I went to work with GE in 1957 and knew nothing of our space programs – only that JFK said, “Now it is time to take longer strides – time for a great new American enterprise – time for this nation to take a clearly leading role in space achievement.” It was a powerful statement at that time, and I saw my opportunity to combine my lifelong interest in space travel and my art.

The first assignment in my new job was to illustrate every missile in the US Arsenal, of which there were about 30 or 40. This was before the Russians put Sputnik into orbit. I knew nothing of what these vehicles looked like or how many there were. After a great amount of research, I gathered enough material to complete the assignment and became somewhat of an authority on US missiles. The finished illustration was approximately 4 feet long and 2.5 feet high and done in black and white with the airbrush. The piece became popular and was used throughout the missile and space industry.

After 16 years of working with scientists and engineers at the height of the Space Race, I became fully familiar with most aspects of most space programs, b ut more important, I was in a position to obtain all the research materials I needed to illustrate any space oriented assignment. Much is to be said about my art career in this field, but I leave that for another time.

So if you want to become a space artist, get a good art education and find a job with a space oriented company. Good luck!


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