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1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - Back Cover

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - July

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - May

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - March

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - February

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - October

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - September

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - June

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - August

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - January

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - December

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - November

1961 US Army Sketch Calendar - Cover

GE Snap-27 on Apollo 12 Mission

Mars Polar Outpost

Mars Orbiting City

Mars Subsurface City

Mars Metropolis

Mars Early Subsurface Outpost

Mars Trip Characteristics from "The Mars Exploration Chart"

Mission Profile from "The Mars Exploration Chart"

Mars Physical Data from "The Mars Exploration Chart"

Mercator's Projection of Mars from "The Mars Exploration Chart"

Mars Globe from "The Mars Exploration Chart"

Major Parameters of Exploration from

Mars Exploration from "The Mars Exploration Chart"

Mariner IV Photographs from "The Mars Exploration Chart"

The Mars Exploration Chart

Aerospace Management Magazine, 1971, Vol 6, No 1

Aerospace Management Magazine, 1969, Vol 4, No 1

Aerospace Management Magazine, Spring 1966, Vol 1, No 1

Aerospace Management Magazine, Summer 1966, Vol 1, No 1

Launch Sequence, Dyna-Soar (Titan III), The New York Times, Major Feature 1962

Titan III, Dyna-Soar (Titan III), The New York Times, Major Feature 1962

Dyna-Soar (Titan III), The New York Times, Major Feature 1962

Landing Pattern, Dyna-Soar (Titan III), The New York Times, Major Feature 1962

Re-Entry, Dyna-Soar (Titan III), The New York Times, Major Feature 1962

Interceptor, Dyna-Soar (Titan III), The New York Times, Major Feature 1962

Reconnaissance, Dyna-Soar (Titan III), The New York Times, Major Feature 1962

International Association of Astronomical Artists

America's Astronauts -

Introducing Father Ralph Hartman

Safe Down, Man on Moon NYT 1962

Homing Flight, Man on Moon, NYT 1962

Moonwork, Man on Moon, NYT 1962

Soft Touchdown, Man on Moon, NYT 1962

Slow Approach, Man on Moon, NYT 2006

Space Life, Man on Moon, NYT 1962

Join-up, Man on Moon, NYT 1962

Man on the Moon, New York Times March 4, 1962

Man Steps Out -Setup, 1964

Man Steps Out - Upkeep, 1964

Man Steps Out - Spacemen at Work, 1964

When Man Steps Into Space

Grandma Moses

Chesley Bonestell

Space Station Article for The New York Times 1962

Space Station Components 1962

Space Station Observatory 1962

Space Station in Action 1962

Space Station Join-Up 1962

Space Station Rendezvous 1962

Space Station Training Base 1962

Space Station Repairs 1962

Space Station Service Stop 1962

Advanced Lunar City

Closed-Cycle Societies

Improvements in Man

Importance of Space Flight

Civilizations in Space

Science and Religion in Space

Mechanism of Resurrection

Becoming a Space Artist

About Dandridge Cole

Predicting the Future

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Civilizations in Space
Apr 03, 2005 // // Civilizations in Space

Only a very few people talked seriously about colonizing space a few years ago. Now the idea is generally accepted, and many large companies are making detailed plans for commercializing space in the next 50 years.

But then what? Will the colonies be sustained almost entirely by supplies brought from Earth as Jamestown and other early American colonies were supported from Europe? Or will they eventually become self-sustaining?

These questions led me to doing several illustrations that once started, I could not stop. I became obsessed with them. One was the “Inside-out World,” the external view; the other of the set was the “Inside-out World,” the internal view.

The external view was an asteroid approximately 20 miles long and 10 miles in diameter. Once hollowed out by use of controlled nuclear devices, sunlight would be reflected down the central axis to provide light and heat on the inside. The asteroid would spin along this long axis to produce a controlled artificial gravity.

A colony of 10,000 to a million people could live safely and happily on the 600 square miles of inside surface of an “inside-out world.” Living conditions of the colonists would be much like that of the future citizens of advanced technological societies on Earth, except for a strange upturning horizon. To the visitor these differences might be disturbing at first, but the native would enjoy the greater freedom of motion and the splendor of his three-dimensional panoramic view. He would not trade this for the confining and limiting environmental of Earth.

The illustration became very popular and was reproduced throughout the world. I even had a call from a Hollywood director asking me to reproduce the illustration as a mural on his bedroom wall substituting the figures with him, his wife and son.

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