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Highlights

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - Back Cover

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - July

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - May

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - March

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - February

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - October

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - September

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - June

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - August

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - January

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - December

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - November

1961 US Army Sketch Calendar - Cover

GE Snap-27 on Apollo 12 Mission

Mars Polar Outpost

Mars Orbiting City

Mars Subsurface City

Mars Metropolis

Mars Early Subsurface Outpost

Mars Trip Characteristics from "The Mars Exploration Chart"

Mission Profile from "The Mars Exploration Chart"

Mars Physical Data from "The Mars Exploration Chart"

Mercator's Projection of Mars from "The Mars Exploration Chart"

Mars Globe from "The Mars Exploration Chart"

Major Parameters of Exploration from

Mars Exploration from "The Mars Exploration Chart"

Mariner IV Photographs from "The Mars Exploration Chart"

The Mars Exploration Chart

Aerospace Management Magazine, 1971, Vol 6, No 1

Aerospace Management Magazine, 1969, Vol 4, No 1

Aerospace Management Magazine, Spring 1966, Vol 1, No 1

Aerospace Management Magazine, Summer 1966, Vol 1, No 1

Launch Sequence, Dyna-Soar (Titan III), The New York Times, Major Feature 1962

Titan III, Dyna-Soar (Titan III), The New York Times, Major Feature 1962

Dyna-Soar (Titan III), The New York Times, Major Feature 1962

Landing Pattern, Dyna-Soar (Titan III), The New York Times, Major Feature 1962

Re-Entry, Dyna-Soar (Titan III), The New York Times, Major Feature 1962

Interceptor, Dyna-Soar (Titan III), The New York Times, Major Feature 1962

Reconnaissance, Dyna-Soar (Titan III), The New York Times, Major Feature 1962

International Association of Astronomical Artists

America's Astronauts -

Introducing Father Ralph Hartman

Safe Down, Man on Moon NYT 1962

Homing Flight, Man on Moon, NYT 1962

Moonwork, Man on Moon, NYT 1962

Soft Touchdown, Man on Moon, NYT 1962

Slow Approach, Man on Moon, NYT 2006

Space Life, Man on Moon, NYT 1962

Join-up, Man on Moon, NYT 1962

Man on the Moon, New York Times March 4, 1962

Man Steps Out -Setup, 1964

Man Steps Out - Upkeep, 1964

Man Steps Out - Spacemen at Work, 1964

When Man Steps Into Space

Grandma Moses

Chesley Bonestell

Space Station Article for The New York Times 1962

Space Station Components 1962

Space Station Observatory 1962

Space Station in Action 1962

Space Station Join-Up 1962

Space Station Rendezvous 1962

Space Station Training Base 1962

Space Station Repairs 1962

Space Station Service Stop 1962

Advanced Lunar City

Closed-Cycle Societies

Improvements in Man

Importance of Space Flight

Civilizations in Space

Science and Religion in Space

Mechanism of Resurrection

Becoming a Space Artist

About Dandridge Cole

Predicting the Future

Filter your Future:
The Mars Exploration Chart
Jul 28, 2007 // // Mars

The Mars Exploration Chart
Published by General Electric’s Technology Center, Valley Forge, Pennsylvania, 1966
Finished size 28 x 22.5, Full Color, folded to 8.25 x 11.25
First Run 50,000 copies printed
Artist: Roy Scarfo

In 1965 while working as the Art Director for General Electric’s Space Technology Center (the largest private space facility in the world), I started work on two major projects which were aside from my regular work load. They were “The Mars Exploration Chart” and the “AstroSolar Chart.”

In my research for the Mars chart I traveled to Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, AZ, where my contact there was Henry Giclas. At 97 years old today, Henry is still at Lowell and we remain friends to this day.

In addition to Henry, I worked with Dr. V. Slipher, a past director of the observatory, Bob Burnham, stellar astronomer, and Norman Thomas, a planetary astronomer. All wonderful people. I spent the better part of a week making sketches of Mars looking through various Lowell telescopes. I did not see craters on Mars.

After completion of all the art off and on for over six months, I reviewed all my original art with people from Lowell Observatory, JPL in Pasadena, and people from NASA in Washington, DC.

It was not until July of 1965 that we received the first close-up views of Mars from the Mariner IV project and the photos we received were of less than one percent of the Martian surface. See detail panels below


The Mars Chart became one of the most requested giveaways in the history of GE. Thousands were distributed by Lowell, NASA, and JPL and space agencies throughout the world.

I have never checked the Mercator’s projection map of Mars nor the Mars globe I did against today’s Mars mapping.

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