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1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - Back Cover

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - July

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - May

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - March

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - February

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - October

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - September

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - June

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - August

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - January

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - December

1961-62 US Army Sketch Calendar - November

1961 US Army Sketch Calendar - Cover

GE Snap-27 on Apollo 12 Mission

Mars Polar Outpost

Mars Orbiting City

Mars Subsurface City

Mars Metropolis

Mars Early Subsurface Outpost

Mars Trip Characteristics from "The Mars Exploration Chart"

Mission Profile from "The Mars Exploration Chart"

Mars Physical Data from "The Mars Exploration Chart"

Mercator's Projection of Mars from "The Mars Exploration Chart"

Mars Globe from "The Mars Exploration Chart"

Major Parameters of Exploration from

Mars Exploration from "The Mars Exploration Chart"

Mariner IV Photographs from "The Mars Exploration Chart"

The Mars Exploration Chart

Aerospace Management Magazine, 1971, Vol 6, No 1

Aerospace Management Magazine, 1969, Vol 4, No 1

Aerospace Management Magazine, Spring 1966, Vol 1, No 1

Aerospace Management Magazine, Summer 1966, Vol 1, No 1

Launch Sequence, Dyna-Soar (Titan III), The New York Times, Major Feature 1962

Titan III, Dyna-Soar (Titan III), The New York Times, Major Feature 1962

Dyna-Soar (Titan III), The New York Times, Major Feature 1962

Landing Pattern, Dyna-Soar (Titan III), The New York Times, Major Feature 1962

Re-Entry, Dyna-Soar (Titan III), The New York Times, Major Feature 1962

Interceptor, Dyna-Soar (Titan III), The New York Times, Major Feature 1962

Reconnaissance, Dyna-Soar (Titan III), The New York Times, Major Feature 1962

International Association of Astronomical Artists

America's Astronauts -

Introducing Father Ralph Hartman

Safe Down, Man on Moon NYT 1962

Homing Flight, Man on Moon, NYT 1962

Moonwork, Man on Moon, NYT 1962

Soft Touchdown, Man on Moon, NYT 1962

Slow Approach, Man on Moon, NYT 2006

Space Life, Man on Moon, NYT 1962

Join-up, Man on Moon, NYT 1962

Man on the Moon, New York Times March 4, 1962

Man Steps Out -Setup, 1964

Man Steps Out - Upkeep, 1964

Man Steps Out - Spacemen at Work, 1964

When Man Steps Into Space

Grandma Moses

Chesley Bonestell

Space Station Article for The New York Times 1962

Space Station Components 1962

Space Station Observatory 1962

Space Station in Action 1962

Space Station Join-Up 1962

Space Station Rendezvous 1962

Space Station Training Base 1962

Space Station Repairs 1962

Space Station Service Stop 1962

Advanced Lunar City

Closed-Cycle Societies

Improvements in Man

Importance of Space Flight

Civilizations in Space

Science and Religion in Space

Mechanism of Resurrection

Becoming a Space Artist

About Dandridge Cole

Predicting the Future

Filter your Future:
Grandma Moses
May 10, 2006 // // People

Anna Mary Robertson (Grandma Moses) was born on September 7, 1860, in Greenwich, New York. She spent most of her life as a farmer’s wife and raising her five children. She became serious about painting when she was in her mid-seventies.

Her scenes of rural life were first exhibited in New York City in 1939, and her one-woman show brought national recognition. In 1941 she received a New York State prize for one of her paintings, “The Old Oaken Bucket,” and in 1949, President Harry S. Truman presented her with the Women’s’ National Press Club Award for outstanding accomplishment in art. “I like to paint old-timely things,” she said. Her work is called primitive art, simple and clear. Her theme was American rural life.

The contrast between Grandma Moses and the space race in the late ‘50s was so great, and because of her popularity at the time, and her primitive style of painting, my thought of a space painting by Grandma Moses would be a painting to behold.

The concept was so interesting to me that I presented it to my boss at GE. When he stopped laughing, he thought it would be a great idea, too, and gave me the green light to contact her agent and to commission her to do a space painting.

I had a beautiful photo of a Minute Man missile at lift-off with a GE nose cone on top. This was the piece we decided to have her do.

I contacted a friend of mine at a New York City agency to find out who her agent was, which he did. I then contacted the agent, and we discussed the concept. He was also enthusiastic about such a project. He informed me he would talk with Grandma Moses and get back to me in a few days.

Two days later the GE Space Center was picketed by peace activists that received national attention. Two days after that I received a call from Grandma Moses’ agent informing me that she was not interested in doing the painting because of her feeling about war and weapons of mass destruction, and to thank me for the offer. I tried to convince him of the benefits to mankind as a result of the space program, but to no avail. To this day I think of that painting and what it would have looked like from her vision.

Grandma Moses died about two years later at age 101 and painted twenty-five pictures in the last year of her life.


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